Berlin Graffiti Art – Learning To Love The Outlier

Berlin, Germany graffiti art

Like so many other people, my impression of Berlin (before visiting) was formed by the images I saw and articles I read. I considered it to be a gritty city, one with little warmth and one defined by its past. I wasn’t entirely correct and my initial thoughts missed nearly all of the positive aspects of the city, which I have come to know and love. But it’s interesting to me that nearly all of my preconceptions were aroused by what is arguably Berlin’s greatest legacy to the modern art world – graffiti or street art.

The phenomenon of graffiti art in Berlin came about organically in the 1970s and 1980s, along with the construction of the new and even more intimidating version of the Berlin Wall. While the East side of the wall was a no-man’s land, the Western side displayed everything from simple acts of vandalism to true works of art by artists who would go on to be famous in their own right. These creative tendencies spilled out into the rest of the city and today Berlin is one of the most graffiti’d city in the world. Sure, some of it is simple vandalism, but so much more of it carries a message or tells a story. It is street art in its purest form and even UNESCO recognized its importance in naming Berlin a City of Design.

Graffiti work is still done, but it’s become more mainstream. When I was in the Ritz Carlton, the message boards were designed with famous Berlin graffiti scenes. That would have been unheard of even a few years ago. There’s still a healthy amount of controversy over the city’s illegal art, but to many it has come to define the city. Seeing it in person I immediately realized how wrong I was about it; I soon appreciated how beautiful the street art could be and how important it is. The messages are ones that need to be shared, they’re messages of social issues and responsibility and just as they once fought against repression today they tackle new problems, like LGBT rights and racial intolerance.

Walking around town it’s impossible to miss the art scene, and while there are specific tours just about the graffiti history I think it’s best to experience it naturally, as it was meant to be seen. But don’t let it fool you; the art is just that, art. It belies not an undercurrent of crime or a lack of caring, in fact it proves just how much Berliners have always loved their city and how very much they want to see it improve.

 

 

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By: Matt Long

Matt has a true passion for travel. As someone who has a bad case of the travel bug, Matt travels the world in order to share tips on where to go, what to see and how to experience the best the world has to offer.Also follow Matt on Twitter, Facebook and

5 Responses

  1. Gabriel

    Awesome, I’ve always been a fan of street art when done well.

    Reply
  2. Dennis Kopp

    Thanks for sharing these great graffiti impressions, Matt! Admittedly I took some graffiti photos as well when I was visiting Berlin and I was quite pleased to see that it still existed, even if the city itself has become very modern and quite sterile at times. There used to be a lot more wild graffiti around at all the abandoned places, but nowadays the graffiti has become quite polished. Still it’s a great form of art and big part of Berlin…

    Reply
  3. Shaun

    Awesome shots! I had much of the same images in my head before visiting Berlin. I was completely blown away but how cool the city and people were and I didn’t even see the street art that you are pointing out! Guess I should go back for a closer look.

    Shaun

    Reply
  4. John Williams

    Matt, of course street art is best experienced as part of a random discovery process, but it is so much more rewarding to find out who the artists are. My usual starting place of learning for all things street art is Flickr. In fact many of the pieces in your post are by artists not born in Berlin. Roa is Belgian, Blu is Italian, Victor Ash was born in Portugal but lives in Denmark, but at least El Bocho (born in Spain) has setlled in the city.

    Reply
  5. Elena

    Impressive! Have no idea why, but I like “It’s time to dance” lady a lot. There’s a pretty similar place in Marseille with loads of impressive street art from local and Eu artists.

    Reply

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